Wednesday, 15 March 2017

AHDB is beefing up returns from grass

Matt House is a beef farmer based in Somerset.  He is part of a group of farmers who are involved with the AHDB-funded ‘Beef from Grass’ project, which aims to highlight the potential of grass and forages for beef cattle production and provide practical guidance on how beef producers can improve their current grazing management. Here Matt blogs about the two-year project and how his herd is benefiting from good grass management.


I am part of a group of four beef improver farmers, who are interested in improving our beef performance from grass. A key element of the project was to link us up with four mentor grassland beef producers, which have really helped us in seeing the potential of grass and grazed forage to aid beef growth rates in beef cattle. The project is in its second year and I have seen some positive results. I have managed to increase forage utilisation by 30 per cent and grass growth from 9.8t Dry Matter/ha to 12-13t Dry Matter/ha on the new grass leys. How have I managed to do this?

The first thing I did when taking over the running of Bowden Farms was implement rotational grazing. This was achieved by splitting up the grass fields into smaller two hectare paddocks using electric fencing. The 69 Aberdeen Angus cross cows and their calves were moved every three days throughout the grazing season. The calves were sold at nine months of age, with an average weight of 321kg per head, which meant in total I managed to produce more than 22 tonnes of beef solely from forage.

I measure grass growth on a weekly basis using a plate meter. I upload this to grass management software, which assists me in analysing the data. I am currently focusing on preparing for the 2017 grazing season and have used the software to put together a spring grazing plan. The benefit of this is that it takes the guesswork out of grassland management and ensures that sufficient grass is grazed early enough to allow time for re-growth for the second rotation. The current grazing wedge is shown below, with grass growth at 12.9 Dry Matter kg/ha/day. So far this year 10.1kg N/ha of fertiliser has been applied.



I implement a 100 per cent out-wintering policy, which has helped me reduce my cost of production. The 122 suckler cows and heifers, which are due to calve this month, were out-wintered on stubble turnips supplemented with round bales of straw and hay arranged in situ.
The suckler cows will calve on the grass paddocks using the Dry Matter intakes calculated by the grass management software, which will adjust the cows’ daily grass allowance. This means that as each cow calves she will be changed from “dry” to “lactating” and the grass allocation will go up from 10kg/Dry Matter to 16kg/dry Matter, therefore changing the time spent in each paddock for the whole herd.


Alongside measuring the grass, I am also very keen to track animal performance throughout the grazing season. The cows have been weighed and body condition scored (BCS) before calving and their calves will be weighed at birth and then regularly throughout the year. This way I will be able to accurately measure how much beef I am producing from the grass.

Key outcomes in March 2017:

  •        All cows body condition scored (BCS), the average was BCS 3
  •        All first-calving heifers condition scored, average was BCS 3
  •    Cows will be monitored closely for signs of calving and removed from turnips and grouped on paddocks accordingly

For more information on the Beef from Grass project sign up to our Grazing Club e-newsletter by emailing: brp@ahdb.org.uk. More information is available in the BRP manual Planning Grazing Strategies for Better Returns.