Wednesday, 1 March 2017

Red meat and health: cutting through the confusion

It can sometimes feel like the red meat sector is beset with challenges on all sides. Livestock farmers are only too familiar with the challenges of legislative issues, red tape, day-to-day animal husbandry and business management, and all the other things that go with running a farm. Then they turn on the news or open a newspaper and see a report or an advert urging people to eat less red meat for the sake of their health or because it is bad for the environment.

Rebutting these messages is a constant uphill battle for an industry with limited resources, particularly as there are now a plethora of days and weeks celebrating veganism and vegetarianism. On our side, individuals and organisations within the beef and lamb sectors have got together to promote Great British Beef week (from April 23) and Love Lamb Week (from September 1), which are gaining momentum year on year.



These weeks focus on celebrating all that is good about our products and our environmentally sustainable production systems. Unfortunately, all too often, those who oppose meat consumption focus on our negatives rather than their own positives.

There should be a balanced, properly informed debate on issues around consumption of red meat so people can make their own choices, and the work of AHDB seeks to provide that balance, using evidence-based messaging.



The reality is that we are omnivores. Meat has always been a part of the human diet and ninety-seven per cent of the population still eat it to some extent. Grazing animals, such as cattle and sheep, turn something we can’t eat (grass) into something we can, the nutrients from which are effectively deployed by our digestive system.
With so many headlines about the need to reduce our meat consumption, it is important to remember that levels of red meat consumption in the UK remain within the recommended guideline amount of 70g per day cooked weight. Red meat is a rich source of protein, which helps build and maintain muscles, plus it provides a number of vitamins and minerals, including B12, which is not found naturally in foods of plant origin.

As for the impact on the environment, many of England’s most iconic landscapes only look the way they do because of the extensive farming of cattle and sheep over hundreds of years. Livestock are responsible for some greenhouse gases in the form of methane, which is a natural by-product of rumination, however, these levels are falling as farming becomes more efficient.



On a final point, just ask yourself what is more natural than having cattle and sheep grazing pastures that could not be used to produce food in any other way?