Wednesday, 17 October 2018

Red meat and its links to the environment and climate change

There is constant debate around red meat and the impact it has on our environment. James Wilde, Head of Media and PR at AHDB, explains how the organisation is trying to tackle negative messages around farming and climate change and help farmers to learn more about the impact of their farm businesses on the environment.

In the last week, the Government has sought the advice of climate experts on whether to set an even more ambitious target than its current one for reducing carbon emissions. It follows a report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), showing rapid action is needed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to avoid devastating impacts from climate change.

As a consequence, the issue of climate change has had a very high media profile, with a number of articles from the likes of the Independent and the Guardian advising a reduction in consumption of red meat leading to a reduction of global greenhouse gas emissions is a must. The only dissenting voice in this debate has been that of Climate Minister Claire Perry, who has come under fire for her comments about her own preference for eating lots of local meat and her refusal to advise people about a climate-friendly diet.

It is a fact that methane, which is a natural by-product of how livestock break down their feed, does contribute to greenhouse gases. However, levels of methane emissions are comparatively low in the UK, with livestock production responsible for five per cent of total Greenhouse Gas emissions, and the industry is working hard to reduce these even further through breeding and feeding initiatives.

It is also balanced by the fact that grazing cattle and sheep manage permanent pasture as an effective carbon sink, they aid biodiversity and they make use of agricultural land that could not be used for growing crops. Effectively, take livestock off it and you take a massive amount of land out of food production at a time when our population continues to grow.

Put in context, livestock production in the UK has many positives which are rarely mentioned in the media coverage of these stories. Food production should be matched to the parts of the world where the land is most suited for the product being grown, the UK is a sustainable place to produce red meat due to our climate and geography, with few inputs required.



However, unfortunately and despite AHDB’s best efforts, many media outlets fail to seek out this balancing opinion. AHDB is using both traditional and social media to provide the industry and the wider public with clear facts surrounding meat and the environment. For more facts on climate change visit the AHDB Beef & Lamb website.

We also challenge misinformation whenever we can and attempt to inject balance into conversations which are being aired in public. Often a measure of success can be to keep things out of the media!

What is important is that we speak with a consistent voice – from farming in the UK and across the globe – to ensure we present an authoritative, robust and realistic view of how livestock farming benefits the environment.

AHDB information on climate change

Our Landscapes without Livestock report provides a visual guide to what impact a reduction in beef and sheep farming would have on some of England’s most cherished landscapes
We have also produced a series of three roadmaps exploring the environmental aspects of beef and sheep farming in more detail.



For more information, visit our corporate publications area to download: Change in the Air, Testing the Water and Down to earth.